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20131202
20131210
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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
that leadership and what you remember then. congress had to lead america's foreign policy when it came to the issue of south africa. >> it was a very, very tough time. i got elected two months after ronald reagan vetoed the bill and when i met him at the white house that december, he and i got into a rather loud argument of discussion about why it was wrong. he ultimately relented because the senate would have its way. it was a tough fight. i got involved as a student with the movement and led as a member of the city council during which point mr. mandela found out about it and wrote me a short letter that said thank you so much for your support and in bold letters he said don't give up. i thought that was interesting because we didn't want him to give up. it's a tough way to go and to keep this in context. he was up against quite a bit as were the people of south africa. there were a number of determined people here, black, white, jewish who continued it work on behalf of his freedom. >> senator, we have you on not because you are a senator in the u.s. foreign relations committee, but
for that few years at the state department was best gift. >> the mix of foreign policy to describe her time in state and seem to all agree he was a more cautious secretary of state. but i think that can stem from a number of things. i think she by nature is a more cautious person and maybe thinking about 2016 and also could have been a lot of pressure from the administration to be cautious. i'm with luke, i think the american people have short term memories and b i don't think foreign policy is on their radar. if you look at things they care about, foreign policy is nowhere on that list. they only care with foreign policy as it connects to the economy. if anything, her time at state will benefit her. if you can picture her on the debate stage with chris christie, who doesn't have any foreign policy experience. if you look at it that way, i think it only benefits her. i think benghazi is not going to define her legacy long term. >> speaking of benghazi, there's something we need to compare, the two secretaries of state that preceded her, you find they had several ben gazdyes and it's worth n
and allowing, at the time, sort of which side of the barricade are you on type of foreign policy and you wonder what is the lesson now, right? what do you takeaway from what frankly where we are, american political culture was slow in many ways. where are we, you know, where are we today. where will we regret in 25 years that we were slow in not being on the right side of an issue or right side of history. >> what nelson mandela has said often when he was dealing with his own internal battles within the black coalition in the government as well as whites which is this idea there was a common purpose for south africa after he was released from south africa and when he came president. that's the kind of lesson that can be shared that transcends south africa in his time. where do countries, where do governments of all branches feel they are in it together and have a common purpose to solve problems, to advance freedom, to advance people from all background. i think that's one of the lessons that he already has given. i think it's amazing that chuck is right, i think he was viewed, mandela was in m
. jim baker said on "morning joe" today, this was a time when congress took on the foreign policy, first override of foreign policy veto of a president in that century. >> it really was. first let me say, i'm honored to be with my sister and friend maxine waters, who i think played a magnificent role giving momentum to the divestment effort. just quickly i want to go back and indicate a little known bit of history. >> why was mandela in oakland, california. of all places. yankee stadium, the mayor, mayor cuomo. he came to see you, didn't he? >> i was overwhelmed. nelson mandela. oakland doesn't win a lot of battles over big cities. he said i'm going to oakland to thank ron and his constituency. for this iconic human being to come to oakland to say thank you was an amazing event. we walk out on the stage and mandela looks out into this incredible sea of humanity. he said now i better understand you, i better understand your politics. i looked at him and he said you represent the human family. you represent where we must go. you represent the future of south africa. that was such an incred
story. >>> we're going to come back with our roundtable. we'll talk a little about foreign policy, the challenges facing the u.s. overseas at the moment. iran, afghanistan just this . >>> here now, some of this week's images to remember. >>> i did love the guy on twitter pour me coffee who wrote, good job today, sports. >> i'm still shell shocked. >> we're not talking about any more reports because we're running out of time. but you're here with first read sunday. a lot to look forward to in the week ahead. surely they can get a budget deal with everything going so well on health care. >> on december 13, house republican paul ryan when it comes to the budget, nancy pelosi, they have to come up with a top line number that they're agreeing to saying in order to avoid a shutdown in january. remember, we ran out of funding in january, so december 13 is when they have to come up with this line, and i don't want to get into sequester and all these issues, but it has come to just this very small agreement. i think they will. democrats have a little leverage here, david, because republica
and a strong presence on foreign policy than a senator from indiana. there was a global push for this from faith leaders and from anti-segregationists here in this country. we heard just now the secretary general of the united nations that no one has done more. no one in our era and generation has done more to fight discrimination than the moral leadership and example of this man who suffered for 27 years yet came out of prison with his wife winnie at his side and she has been imprisoned for 18 months at that time. in the anc, they came out of prison and marched in that march and from then on, his days in prison spoke of reconciliation. for that that he won the nobel prize and went on as he became. he helped sign into law the law that outlawed discrimination against the white minority. that belief in reconciliation that created a new south africa. that was a model for nations for people around the world. >> did he do it with kindness? >> he did it with love and with kindness and wit and humor. when he came here, he so impressed american presidents, we know how close he was with bill clinto
. nobody had overturned a presidential veto on foreign policy in the 20th century. you had 37 and 53 republicans, including richard lugar who is still there. mitch mcconnell who said he was in college during civil rights movement and then he was on the side of civil rights and then it got all complicated with affirmative action and bussing and sanctions he said made it all clear again. he stood up again against the president. i was covering the white house then and occasionally they would bring in small groups of reporters to chat with the president on the theor theory w each other. it was during this period the president said more black people drive and own cars in south africa than there are cars in the soviet union and to him that sort of rationalized, this was, you know, communism is the evil system. and you had po to do everything to stand up to communism. i remember clearly he reached for two cookies and said he had half a sandwich for lunch. pat buchanon was a speech writer in the white house then. i recalled this memory to him. he said he wrote that lean. he got it from comme
can begin to do something about the income inequality in this country. >> let me switch to you foreign policy. secretary kerry met three hours with prime minister netanyahu. he's heading back to jerusalem for more private meetings with netanyahu. they agreed to disagree about the short-term iran deal. senator hutchison, his argument, kerry's argument, we still are keeping sanctions other than freezing assets. this will be better for israel in the long-term and we won't agree to a long-term deal that gives iran the ability to have a nuclear weapon. netanyahu's argument is there would be breakout capability. what do you think the secretary of state should be doing? >> i think you're seeing some of the effects right now whereas mr. netanyahu was going to stop putting settlements in the west bank. now that's been pulled back. i think israelis are very concerned about this. i think the concern i'm hearing also is when you have a carrot and you're offering something, you need to see that the other side is doing that before you give the relief from the sanctions. i think that is the criticism
. it was the first override of a presidential veto on a foreign policy issue in the century. and anti-apartheid leaders credit those sanctions and credit the private divestment movement around the united states and around the world with bringing about the pressure and the isolation that was necessary to eventually humble the apartheid regime. to humble the ruling south african government and bring them to the negotiations that eventually freed nelson mandela and brought him into the apartheid system. the fight here to do that was nothing compared to the fight in south africa, but politically, it was a he can of a fight here too. joining us now is former california congressman and former oakland mayor, ron dellums. he was the sponsor of the 1986 antiapartheid act. congressman dellums, nice to see you. thank you very much for being here. >> it's an honor to be here. i'm one of your great fans, my friend. >> well, thank you. tell me what led you to sponsor the antiapartheid act in the 1986? >> a little-known fact in history is that a group of african-american employees of the polaroid co
and foreign policy? he needs that trifecta. we are getting it with the economy. the iran deal. i think the other thing is who 2014 benefits. i'm not sure yet. when you listen to the focus group and others, parts and the sense that we have tried in one direction and another direction. where do we go from here? >> what was interesting, somebody said maybe we need an independent. when you play that out for everybody in that focus group, they came around and said i have to pick one party or the other. >> what has been the experience and raise people's hopes and the tea party, that was an experience of frustration by a lot of americans and some people who supported the tea party that is not what we were buying. that's the worst thing is people don't see a way out and feel powerless to affect their own government. >> those people don't vote? they said they were going to vote. >> most will. frustration needs to come up. the 2014 elections are in the same states. >> the federal elections. >> it's more severe. >> dan, fred, susan, thank you all. we will be back. i got my take away and the trivi
that consideration. you can't undermine foreign policy. it will give obama time to see the deal through if it works and maybe they can go back and revert and say maybe they don't need to do sanctions. >> it is a work in progress, fluid situation. when we come back, members of the right flank would have you believe happy holidays is an affront to the way of life. culture warriors battle war on christmas, millions of americans fight just to have a christmas. we will discuss. i do a lot oresearch on angie's list before i do any projects on my home. i love my contractor, and i am so thankful to angie's list for bringing us together. find out why more than two million members count on angie's list. angie's list -- reviews you can trust. for all those who sleep for all those who sleep too hot or too cool, now there's a solution. sleep number dual temp, the revolutionary temperature-balancing layer with active air technology that works on any mattress brand, including yours. it's only at a sleep number store, where this holiday season, the hottest sleep innovations make the coolest gifts - including sleep
period. just as president biden dealing with another foreign policy headaches on the other side of the world. he arrived in tokyo. he was met when he arrived there by caroline kennedy, the new ambassador. this as china is now threatening to declare unilaterally control over airspace long disputed with japan. joining me now with all these challenges, msnbc contributor, former adviser on iran to the white house ambassador dennis ross. thanks for being with us. lets talk about iran. president rouhani declared over the weekend in an interview with the "new york times" they have won the right to enrich, just as we in a hard fought battle with emrates, uae, nonproliferation effort talked them into foreswearing the right to enrich. others in the region are watching the way we handle iran. what do you think of these negotiations as far as they have gone so far? >> well, look, you do have a first step. the idea of having a first step agreement is not that it somehow has transformed the situation, not that it produced a breakthrough we're going to be confident we're going to transform ura
, foreign policy, our place in the world. that was top of mind. and it seems right now, and i want your thoughts, that young people have a lot of different things on their mind from the folks that you're conversing with here. what is this generation's association with the obama presidency? >> yeah. i mean, the big picture that we have seen is that young people are incredibly politically engaged. they voted in a larger percentage in 2012 and 2008, even though there was less enthusiasm about the obama administration the second time around. what we're seeing now is people waiting to make up their minds. i mean, the obama administration will be remembered by the outcome of this health care law. >> do you think more than anything else? >> more than anything else. and our generation will feel the impact of this law for the next two decades. so if we don't get this right, we're in big, big trouble. so for us i think now is the time to really dig in and see whether this law is good for us, and if not, how can we make it better, because this is going to impact us one way or the other for a long
're in a moment of what we call international unity, the foreign policy legacy of everything related to the apartheid regime was divided in this country and many other nations. you look at say the early origins of investment campaign where a young barack obama as a student was involved, many other young idealists and international humanitarians but it was not seen at the time as a way to actually break the regime. it was seen as first a symbolic step and then got traction. the international program against the apartheid regime was a huge factor. walk us through that. >> that's right. it took a long time to gain motion. it seemed idealistic at the beginning, like many younger obama, i remember taking part myself in the protest on college campuses. and but it gained speed, just because so many people caught onto it. in a sense it was the last really coherent global social protest movement. and of course, it was all rallying around mandela. i can remember very well from those days, free mandela was the great rallying cry as sit-ins and protests were formed on these campuses. so it reall
in remembering our history accurately with apartheid as a foreign policy issue for the united states? >> it seems to me that we seem to forget apartheid in our own country. i was jailed for using the public library. i was jailed for trying to use -- my father -- lots of p.o.w.s didn't have the right to use toilets, hotels, motels. we couldn't use a toilet from texas to florida to maryland. we didn't have the right to vote. and so dr. king's victory was over skin color apartheid and political apartheid and changing world opinion. now, that same movement spilled over in a major way to be the impactful force for freedom in south africa against our own national policy at that time. we changed america's policy towards south africa by our own risk and sacrifice, because anti apartheid victory in america led to apartheid victory in south africa. >> rick, what do you think of that and the reverend's point about that interplay, relatively rare to have this kind of success and an international civil rights movement. >> well, we often forget that during the whole period of the cold war, there was actually a
foreign policies was arrogant and racist. and he said moammar gadhafi, an international pariah at the time, was his friend. he went right ahead and visit gad da fi in tripoli. he was also friends with fidel castro. he vied him after he was rae leased from prison in 1990 and em based the cuban leader because of his support to end apartheid even while the rest of the world shunned castro for his communist dictatorship. in 2003, mandela joined those who were against the u.s.-led war against iraq, and not only called it a tragedy but said "what i am condemning is that one pow we are a president who has no foresight, who no can not think properly, is now wanting to plunge the world into a holocaust. "for those who will only see mandela as the gentle saint, remember, it was he himself who said, "i am no angel." instead, he was complex, imperfect, and human, and we do his memory more justice when we remember the entire man. joining me this morning, mark quarterman from the enough project, amy goodman, host and executive producer of democracy now, khalil mohammed, director of the schaumburg center
there? >> well i think this is the making or breaking of the obama presidency in terms of foreign policy. so, the next six months are going to be absolutely crucial. it's a temporary agreement and there's going to be a question of whether iran can be trusted and take tot the next stage. >> what about afghanistan? many of us in this country expect over the next 12 months or so, that would effectively end or a deal to keep some troops on. when america leaves what will that mean for the country? >> there needs deal. it's a bad thing president karzai is playing politics with this and not getting on and doing it. it is crucial. there's an election in afghanistan next year. the question will be is there enough credibility in that election to keep the security situation under control and it will require some continued presence of american forces there. >> you mentioned china and perhaps the continued slow down on the chinese economy but we're seeing think it week, a rise in regional tensions driven by chinese nationalism over this disputed set of islands. what happens in that region in terms of
came during a foreign policy conversation at a washington think tank forum. nbc's kristen welker is live for us at the white house. kristen, did the president successfully sell his deal today? >> reporter: well, craig, i think that remains to be seen. but that is what he was doing. he was trying to sell this deal to the skeptics here in the united states, but also to israelis, a lot of israeli journalists in the audience there today. if you look at the polls inside israel, a lot of folks don't like this deal. so president obama trying to convince them of the merits of this deal, making the point that, look, it is a test. it's a six-month freeze of iran's nuclear program that will be tested by inspectors who will go into the country and determine their level of seriousness. he also made the point that of the $100 billion worth of sanctions, this scales back about $7 billion of those, leaving the main sanctions in place. here's a little bit more of what he had to say this afternoon. take a listen. >> if we could create an option in which iran eliminated every single nut and bolt of
income in equality at 11:15. he will be talking about immigration he has foreign policy and heads up to hawaii at the end of the month. the president has a ton going on t. supporters think there is good news, maybe the website is steadying now want more of the president every day. >> obviously, the republicans will not let up despite they may be setting up politicos. mike, thanks, so much. >> have a good day, will. >> coming up, jacoby els berry to the yankees. where does that leave robinson cano who wants serious cash. we have possible suitors in sports. [ music playing ] . >> well, the little engine that could keeps chugging along the bronx. >> i don't know how they do it. >> jacoby elsberry leaving fenway, elsberry reportedly agreed to a seven year $153 million year, an option for an eighth year. the speedy fielder giving a good glove. elsbury had batted .298 last year. he's missed a lot of games. the yankees scheduled to introduce their other beg signing, brian mccann, the catcher. tomorrow. elsbury could joan him if he passes that physical. >> it will be good for the yankees. tv
of state schultz and others, former senate foreign relations chairman dick lugar were pushing very strongly for a different policy. >> they were. they knew the veto was a mistake. right after that secretary schultz moved to redescribe anc not as terrorist organization and open up contacts with the group in osaka. >> you were on the ground when he came out -- >> after he came out. >> moved into the negotiations which were critical. >> went up and down in 1992, had a break in the negotiations, a serious break over violence. the two presidents, the two leaders, nelson mandela and f.w. de klerk came together, one of the things they agreed, which is a lesson for other peace processes that thereafter to acts of violence would be allowed to interrupt the peace process. the spoilers would not be allowed to do that. it was important because there was a lot of violence after that. >> that was also true of the northern ireland peace process. that was a key point they could not veto an agreement forward, a lesson not learned by israeli-palestinians sadly. what do you think was the special quality in ne
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)